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Building the MakerGear Mosaic 3D Printer – Part II: The Y-Axis

This is the second installment of my series on building Rick and Karen Pollack’s MakerGear Mosaic 3D printer. This part covers assembly of the robot’s first of three Cartesian axes.

One of the nice features of the Mosaic kit is that several of the more complex subassemblies are supplied pre-built, greatly simplifying construction. This stage of the build consists essentially of decorating the ready-made Y-axis motor mount with a few components—chiefly the Y-axis linear rail, stepper motor, and timing belt.

More:
Building the MakergGear Mosaic 3D Printer – Part I: The Frame

 


News From The Future – Lightest Material On Earth

Light

Scientists invent lightest material on Earth. What now? @ latimes.com.

Scientists have invented a new material that is so lightweight it can sit atop a fluffy dandelion without crushing the little fuzzy seeds. It’s so lightweight, styrofoam is 100 times heavier.

It is so lightweight, in fact, that the research team consisting of scientists at UC Irvine, HRL Laboratories and Caltech say in the peer-reviewed Nov. 18 issue of Science that it is the lightest material on Earth, and no one has asked them to run a correction yet.

That’s light!

The material has been dubbed “ultralight metallic microlattice,” and according to a news release sent out by UC Irvine, it consists of 99.99% air thanks to its “microlattice” cellular architecture.

Ok makers, what would you do with this material?

 

Secret Santa: Sean Michael Ragan – Glass Blowing Class


Sean Michael Ragan - Dangerous Man Alive

For this year’s MAKE Secret Santa gift exchange, I was happy to have pulled Sean Michael Ragan out of the virtual Santa hat. In an effort to help Sean become the most dangerous man alive, I’m giving him something that will help round out his already diverse knowledge base. I know he has expressed interest in glass working in the past, so I’m gifting him a beginner’s 3-hour glass blowing experience at Glass Blowing Austin. The class is limited to just four students, each of whom make their own paperweight by the time class is over. While Sean may not walk out of the workshop that day as the next Dale Chihuly, he can continue to learn the craft with private lessons or work on his own in the studio.

And if that doesn’t make Sean dangerous enough, I figured I could also throw in some iron oxide, aluminum powder, and magnesium ribbon so that he can whip up a batch of thermite at home. Nothing says “happy holidays” like a spectacular thermite reaction, right? Merry Christmas, Sean!

 


DorkbotPDX Video

After watching this great video of DorkbotPDX, how could you not want to attend a Dorkbot? [Thanks, Paul!]

 

Kit-A-Day Giveaway: Free MakerBot!

We’re giving away amazing kits from our new Make: Ultimate Kit Guide EVERY DAY — thousands of dollars worth of merchandise, including MakerBots!

To celebrate the release of our latest publication, the Make: Ultimate Kit Guide 2012 (and its companion website), we’re giving away one of the cool kits reviewed in the issue each day during the holiday season.

To kick things off, we’re giving away a MakerBot Thing-o-Matic (a $1,300 value), featured on the cover of the Ultimate Kit Guide. Here’s Make: Labs intern Eric Chu’s review of Thing-O-Matic from the issue:

If you want to get into 3D printing but don’t know where to start, the MakerBot Thing-O-Matic Kit is the way to go. It’s a complete kit, so you need no additional parts, and a large user community can back you up if problems pop up (not to mention Thingiverse, where you can find awesome open source designs). It took me about 20 hours to build the Thing-O-Matic and start printing, and I improved its accuracy with more tuning, calibrating, and tinkering with settings in the ReplicatorG software. If you have any trouble, read the discussion at the bottom of every build step. I’ve since 3D-printed many fun and handy things (everyone loves a 3D-printed gift!) and the MakerBot is now by far the most-used machine at Make: Labs.

To be eligible for today’s giveaway, all you have to do is leave a comment below in this post. The entry period for today’s prize will be until 11:59pm PST today. We’ll choose one person at random, you’ll be notified by email and you’ll have 48 hours to respond. The winners list will be kept on the Giveaway landing page. That’s it! No purchase necessary or anything else to do. Please leave only one comment per post. You can enter as many giveaways as you like until you win. This giveaway is for US residents only. See the Kit-A-Day Giveaway landing page for full sweepstakes details and Official Rules.

 


Crazed Holiday Kit-A-Day Giveaway!


We’re so excited to be launching our massive Kit-A-Day Giveaway. To celebrate the release of our latest publication, the Make: Ultimate Kit Guide 2012 (and its companion website), we’re giving away one of the cool kits reviewed in the issue each day during the holiday season. From Arduino and electronics kits to beer-making kits to geeky watch and clock kits to… believe it or not… free MakerBots! We’re giving away thousands of dollars in Maker Shed merchandise. Take that, Black Friday!

To be eligible, all you have to do is leave a comment in each day’s giveaway post (comments in this announcement post are NOT eligible). We’ll select one respondent at random and contact him/her via email. You’ll have 48 hours to respond. That’s it! No purchase necessary or anything else to do. Please leave only one comment per post. You can enter as many giveaways as you like until you win. The giveaway is for US residents only.

See the latest giveaways here.

Spread the word! Tell your friends and family members! Tweet this! And Happy Holidays from MAKE.

See the Kit-A-Day Giveaway landing page for full sweepstakes details and Official Rules.

 

Woodbug: A Community Commons, Laser-Cut Building Set


Shaun Crampton’s Woodbug construction set may be purchased from Ponoko or you can download the files for free and mix it up yourself.

 

How-To: Holography

I always assumed that the process of making a hologram was so complex that it was limited to only those with access to expensive lasers and other fancy optical equipment. But when I heard that the Maker Shed started carrying Litiholo’s Hologram Kit, I was surprised that such a thing existed and I was eager to give it a try. After carefully following the directions, my first hologram was visible, but just barely. This was better than I expected, actually. The manual stresses that controlling vibration is the most important factor in creating a good hologram, but I live in a busy Brooklyn apartment building that often feels the low rumble of the subway trains rolling by. I tried to make another, but this time I increased the exposure time from five minutes to fifteen as the instructions suggested. The result was a surprisingly sharp hologram of a toy car.

The science behind the why holograms work and how they’re made is fascinating. In the video above, I explain that the holographic film is sensitive to the interference between the laser beam hitting the plate directly and the beam bouncing off the object. I won’t try to explain it any further, and I’ll leave it up to those who do it best: How Stuff Works has a great write-up of the principles behind these amazing 3D images.

Subscribe to How-Tos with Matt Richardson in iTunes, download the m4v video directly, or watch it on YouTube and Vimeo.

In the Maker Shed:

Makershedsmall

Litiholo's Hologram Kit

 

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