MAKE


MAKE Staff Nerds Out Over Upcoming 3D “School’s Out” Special Issue

Click on the image to see us in jumbo, non-3D.

Today was an exciting day at the MAKE offices as we cracked open the first case of “School’s Out, our next special issue. This issue is very special as it’s devoted to kids and making and it’s in swinging, leaping, page-busting 3D! The thrills! The spills! The over 50 family- and kid-friendly projects!

Look for Make: School’s Out! at Maker Faire Bay Area (May 19-20), and on newsstands and in the Maker Shed after that. It’s a really cool issue which was great fun to put together and we hope it shows.





How-To: Slick, Sturdy PVC Furnishings

PVC Table from MAKE Volume 30

The latest issue of MAKE, Volume 30, is on newsstands everywhere, and one of my favorite projects is actually four projects in one, titled “Pipe Dreams” by Larry Cotton and Phil Bowie. Humble, readily available, and inexpensive, PVC drain pipe can be used to make a variety of unexpected projects. As the article states, PVC “is strong, works like wood, and accepts various fillers and finishes. It’s also thermoplastic, so it can do something wood can’t — bend into new shapes with the application of heat.” Cotton and Bowie share tips and techniques for cutting, drilling, bending, fastening, and finishing PVC, and show you how to make a kids’ table with a dry-erase top and matching stool, a two-faced clock that displays two time zones, a plant holder, and an accent lamp that appears to float on light. These projects are so accessible that you could tackle them all in a weekend. You can find “Pipe Dreams” starting on page 96 of Volume 30, but we’ve also shared the how-tos with you on Make: Projects.

Check them out:
PVC Kids’ Table and Stool
PVC Plant Holder
PVC Two-Faced Clock
PVC Floating Accent Light

PVC Plant Holder from MAKE Volume 30

PVC Two-Faced Clock from MAKE Volume 30

PVC Lamp from MAKE Volume 30

From the pages of MAKE Volume 30:

MAKE Volume 30Until recently, home automation was gimmicky, finicky, and user-hostile. But today, thanks to a new crop of devices and technology standards, home automation is useful, fun, and maker-friendly. In the special section of MAKE Volume 30, we’ll show you: how to flip any switch in your home with a smartphone, home automation without programming, controlling your HVAC with an Arduino, a webcam security system, and a wall-mounted Notification Alert Generator (NAG) that plays timely reminders as you walk by. Plus, you’ll build a Yakitori Grill, a robust R/C flying-wing airplane, sturdy furnishings from PVC, and more!

BUY OR SUBSCRIBE!




Tim O’Reilly and Dale Dougherty discuss the Hardware Innovation Workshop, May 15-16 2012

Recently, Tim O’Reilly, founder of O’Reilly Media, and Dale Dougherty, founder of MAKE, sat down to discuss our upcoming Hardware Innovation Workshop, May 15-16, 2012. The discussion here (and the thrust of the event) is on the innovations coming out of the maker movement and the people behind these emerging, game-changing technologies. Many of the leaders in this movement will be at this event, the first of its kind for MAKE, happening in the lead up to Maker Faire Bay Area (May 19-20). The event in geared towards introducing the wider business world to maker-developed technologies and how these technologies can have an impact on the future of manufacturing and the wider economy.





NEWS FROM THE FUTURE – Car Makers Create Engine Sounds for Electric Cars

News From The Future-23

NEWS FROM THE FUTURE – Car Makers Create Engine Sounds for Electric Cars:

Audi is adding sound to its silent, electric car models with a synthetic solution called Audi e-sound.

Sounds like a TRON cycle. I wonder if they’ll eventually make download-able and purchase-able “engine tones”…




MAKE on NPR


I was interviewed on Nevada NPR affiliate KNPR yesterday along with three other makers (including Keiko Tabeb, founder and designer of Asanoha Love baby carriers, shown above) for a one hour program called “Tinker, Tailor, Maker, DIY: The Make-It-Yourself Movement.” You can listen to an MP3 of the show here.





Dripping Water Turned into Standing Waves

Facebook user Brusspup performed a simple, but interesting, experiment. Passing a tube of water across the front of a loudspeaker yields a standing wave when tuned to a 24 hz sound wave. Then when switched to 23 hz, it appears that the water droplets are actually traveling backwards through the tube they just came out of. A camera recording at a standard 24 fps is playing tricks with the eye when the frequency of the sine wave is very similar.




DIY Mobile Phone


Arduino team member and MIT PhD student David Mellis created this DIY Cell Phone that packs a fascinating premise:

An exploration into the possibilities for individual construction and customization of the most ubiquitous of electronic devices, the cellphone. By creating and sharing open-source designs for the phone’s circuit board and case, we hope to encourage a proliferation of personalized and diverse mobile phones. Freed from the constraints of mass production, we plan to explore diverse materials, shapes, and functions. We hope that the project will help us explore and expand the limits of do-it-yourself (DIY) practice. How close can a homemade project come to the design of a cutting edge device? What are the economics of building a high-tech device in small quantities? Which parts are even available to individual consumers? What’s required for people to customize and build their own devices?

The initial prototype combines a custom electronic circuit board with a laser-cut plywood and veneer enclosure. The phone accepts a standard SIM card and works with any GSM provider. Cellular connectivity is provided by the SM5100B GSM Module, available from SparkFun Electronics. The display is a color 1.8″, 160×128 pixel, TFT screen on a breakout board from Adafruit Industries. Flexures in the veneer allow pressing of the buttons beneath. Currently, the software supports voice calls, although SMS and other functionality could be added with the same hardware. The prototype contains about $150 in parts.

Design files on Github. Love those laser-cut buttons! [via @mellis]




Samuel Goss’s Musical Bicycle 1899

If Samuel Goss, the inventor of this musical bicycle from 1899, could have traveled forward in time he would have fit right in at Maker Faire!

My invention relates to bicycles, and has for its object to provide a combined bicycle and musical instrument whereby the rider when so disposed may treat himself and others in his immediate neighborhood to a musical accompaniment as he rides along.




Interview with WikiHouse’s Alastair Parvin and Nick Ierodiaconou


From MAKE Volume 30:

WikiHouse is an open source construction set: a pool of 3D models of houses and a plugin to help convert them into CNC cutting files, shared under Creative Commons. The WikiHouse SketchUp plug-in turns 3D models into labeled 2D milling sheets that can then be cut on a CNC and put together, like a very big piece of flat-pack furniture. The plug-in script is available on Github for others to build on and improve. wikihouse.cc

I emailed WikiHouse’s Alastair Parvin and Nick Ierodiaconou to confirm the facts of this brief article, and I thought their responses were interesting. Here they are!

Laura: WikiHouse is a community of designers sharing Creative Commons licensed template files.
WikiHouse: Yes, in a sense. We might say it’s the other way around in that the seed of the project is a pool of 3D models of houses and a plugin to help convert them into CNC cutting files, all shared in the public domain under a Creative Commons license, so anyone is welcome to take, use, add and improve them. Of course, initially this has begun primarily with us, the WikiHouse team, our friends, and a growing bunch of people. So the structures shared on there at the moment are mostly by us and our friends, working with Momentum Engineering. But there are a number of other individuals and groups now around the world that we’re aware of who are working on their own iterations and work. We’re hoping more and more of it will be shared soon!

L: GitHub is the platform across which users share their designs.
WH: The WIkiHouse models use Google SketchUp (a free, easy to use 3D modelling tool). The WikiHouse plugin for Google SketchUp uses a script to turn 3d-models into 2d-milling sheets, so from a model you download you can click ‘Make this House’ and it will generate a set of cutting files which can be used to CNC cut the parts for the house from. This plugin script is also open source, and is, as you say, shared on GitHub (a social software platform) for others to build on and improve.

The actual 3D models of the houses themselves are not shared on GitHub – it’s much easier than that! Once you install the WikiHouse plugin for Google SketchUp, models can be uploaded and downloaded more or less at the click of a button straight from SketchUp to the website. Designs can either be downloaded directly for immediate use, else existing designs can be adapted or new ones produced by anyone with a basic knowledge of SketchUp and an understanding of the logic of the system. Instructions are provided on the WikiHouse website.

 

L: The building materials are fabricated from locally sourced plywood cut on a CNC mill.
WH: Yes, exactly. Our motto during the whole project has been a fantastic quote by John Maynard Keynes: “It is easier to ship recipes than cakes and biscuits.”That, after all, is the essence of the maker revolution, our ability to share knowledge and software tools globally, which empowers people locally to use materials available. We chose plywood sheets because they are already widely available, as is (more and more) access to CNC cutting machines to cut the parts for the houses.

The WikiHouse plugin, as well as converting 3D models into 2D cutting files, also labels the parts with their component name, so the actually building process is remarkably fast – it’s really like building a very big piece of flat-pack furniture!

L: Assembly requires minimal skill, by local people.
WH: The assembly is indeed very easy. It requires no power tools (perhaps a screwdriver!) and a few volunteers to put up a structure. It’s actually an incredibly sociable activity we’ve found – reminiscent of community barn raisings. Every time we’ve made a prototype, people have wanted to join in! A small shelter can be erected in a single day.

WikiHouse structures are then ready to be clad and weather-proofed, have services introduced, etc. One of our next ambitions of the project, apart from improving the code and developing the system, is to extend into these other parts of houses, such as cladding, windows, services, etc., such as heat exchangers. Wouldn’t it be great if open source recipes for making your own versions of these were freely available in the public domain?

L: People can design, download, and “print” CNC-milled houses and components.
WH: This is the underlying concept of WikiHouse… We want to make it possible for people to actually design, download, fabricate, and build their own houses, given access to a computer, the internet, some plywood, and a CNC mill. Mills of this sort are becoming increasingly accessible and affordable, with designs to build your own from little more than a power drill, some plywood, and a computer available online. For example, there is the Blackfoot build-your-own CNC mill, which, rather brilliantly, is made from parts which are themselves CNC cut (so the machine can cut replacement parts for itself, or reproduce. You may already be aware of this?).

If the 20th century was all about democratising the ability to consume, we think what the maker movement (and particularly publications like MAKE mag) are bearing witness to is the forming shape of a 21st century, which will be all about democratising the ability to produce for themselves: which will come about by dramatically lowering the threshold and sharing tools and capabilities in the commons.

Houses might seem like quite a large instance of this shift, but it’s such an important and universal need that we think it’s something well worth trying to do! Someone suggested to us that WikiHouse was an attempt to make a YouTube for housing!

L: Started by design firm 00:/, creative collective Espians, and Momentum Engineering.
WH: 00:/, Momentum Engineering, and the Espians were all co-designers of the original WikiHouse system and the original WikiHouse prototype structures.

L: How many contributors do you have currently?
WH: We currently have dozens of people worldwide taking an active interest in development of the WikiHouse system (including hobbyists, carpenters, and university students). In addition, there are many hundreds more who are following the project with interest – to date we are counting some 70,000 unique visitors to our website, and many via Twitter on @WikiHouse. Because it’s all a not-for-profit, open-source venture, we know that slow and steady will win the race, but watch this space for some exciting developments over this year. All kinds of support and donation are welcome!

L: How many houses have been built using WikiHouse? Where?
WH: WikiHouse is still at an experimental stage. Several prototype structures have actually been built, but we are yet to use the system on a finished building. We are currently working on plans to achieve this within the coming year, given some further contributions from the community and the right opportunities to progress to a finished building. There is interest in America, Germany, and New Zealand on this front, and we hope to progress quickly through the next stages of development. If anyone is interested in working with us to achieve this, we’d love for them to get in touch via hello@wikihouse.cc.

L: Are 00:/, Espians, and Momentum Engineering working on any other ventures together?
WH: Yes, we are working on a number of innovative projects together, from sustainable architectural works in the UK to a new open source social networking platform due for release later this year.

From the pages of MAKE Volume 30:

MAKE Volume 30Until recently, home automation was gimmicky, finicky, and user-hostile. But today, thanks to a new crop of devices and technology standards, home automation is useful, fun, and maker-friendly. In the special section of MAKE Volume 30, we’ll show you: how to flip any switch in your home with a smartphone, home automation without programming, controlling your HVAC with an Arduino, a webcam security system, and a wall-mounted Notification Alert Generator (NAG) that plays timely reminders as you walk by. Plus, you’ll build a Yakitori Grill, a robust R/C flying-wing airplane, sturdy furnishings from PVC, and more!

BUY OR SUBSCRIBE!




CMKT 4 West Coast Hackerspace Tour

CMKT 4, the makers of Creme DeMentia Contact Microphones, are excited to announce their upcoming tour. The DeKalb, IL based Hacker-Space-Rock trio will be making their second appearance at the Bay Area Maker Faire in San Mateo, California. Along the way, they will be teaching a number of workshops at Hackerspaces, bringing their total of visited hackerspaces to 60 by the end of this tour. Notable events on this tour include a Sci-Fi Sound Workshop at The Roswell UFO Museum, a visit to the Mojave Makers at the Mojave Air and Space Port, and an appearance on Over The Edge Radio. Visit CMKT 4′s Facebook Events Page for individual workshop details!

5/2 Ames Makerspace – Ames, IA
5/3 Columbia Gadget Works – Columbia, MO
5/4 OHM Space – Oklahoma City, OK
5/5 Dallas Makerspace – Dallas, TX
5/6 ATX Hackerspace – Austin, TX
5/7 10-Bit Works – San Antonio, TX
5/8 International UFO Museum and Research Center – Roswell, NM
5/9 Quelab – Albequeque, NM
5/10 (Flagstaff, AZ)
5/11 Heat Sync Labs – Mesa, AZ
5/12 SYN Shop – Las Vegas, NV
5/14 (San Diego, CA)
5/15 Build Shop – Los Angeles, CA
5/16 Mojave Makers – Mojave Air and Space Port, CA
5/17 Hacker Dojo – Mountain View, CA
5/18 (Thursday Night 5/17 Midnight-3am) Over The Edge radio show – Berkeley, CA
(listen here) http://www.kpfa.org/streams/kpfa_24k.m3u
5/19 Bay Area Maker Faire – San Mateo, CA
5/20 Bay Area Maker Faire – San Mateo, CA
5/21 John Haynes Memorial Veteran’s Hall – Garberville, CA
5/22 Ink Annex – Eureka, CA
5/23 The Curious Forge – Grass Valley, CA
5/24 Bridgewire Reno – Reno, NV
5/25 The Transistor – Provo, UT
5/26 (Boulder, CO)
5/27 Lincoln Hacker League – Lincoln, NE

If you’re near to one of the cities in parentheses above, contact us if you’d like to set up a workshop or performance:
cmktfour (atlas) gmail (dot) com

[via GetLoFi]





Click here to safely unsubscribe from "MAKE." Click here to view mailing archives, here to change your preferences, or here to subscribePrivacy


Your requested content delivery powered by FeedBlitz, LLC, 9 Thoreau Way, Sudbury, MA 01776, USA. +1.978.776.9498