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"Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day..." - 7 new articles

  1. Dropbox Works Nicely
  2. “Putting Teachers to the Test”
  3. “A Brief History Of Intolerance In America”
  4. “Children are more likely to do their homework if they see it as an investment, not a chore”
  5. Some Neat Panoramas Of World Heritage Sites
  6. The Best Posts About Getting Our Students To Attend College
  7. Want A Free (& Good) Curriculum For Geometry, Algebra Or U.S. History (& For Other Classes, Too)?
  8. More Recent Articles
  9. Search Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day...

Dropbox Works Nicely

Dropbox seems to have been around for awhile, but it’s new to me, and I like it a lot. You download the application, and it lets you easily move any of your computer files into it. As you make changes in the documents, it immediately and automatically registers them at Dropbox (and at any of your other computers where you installed the application) and you can access them at anytime either at the Dropbox site or at any of those other computers. Everything is always “in synch” automatically

This will be a big help to me at school, where I will now be able to access tons of the files I have at home related to different classes, and won’t have to worry about flash drives — either at school or if I’m traveling with my laptop.

Dropbox also lets you share any of the files publicly, too.

I suspect there are probably a number of similar apps out there (I know Dropio is good for file-sharing) , but I really like how easy it is to use Dropbox. You get 2GB of storage for free, and then have to pay after that, but that’s plenty of space for me. I uploaded a ton of files — everything for all of my classes, plus everything for all the books I’ve written and the ones I’m working on, and I’ve only used 8% of the alloted space.

A little more back-up of files always can bring some peace of mind, too. Mozy is great for backing-up EVERYTHING, but it’s only designed to replace lost data. You can read more about Mozy and other back-up systems at The Best Ways To Back-Up Your Computer & Online Work,

Let me know what you think of Dropbox, or if you prefer to use other similar applications.

Thanks to App Storm for the tip.


“Putting Teachers to the Test”

Putting Teachers to the Test is a good explanation of “value-added” measures for teachers, where they are evaluated on their students’ growth in test scores. The Wall Street Journal published it today.

I’m adding the link to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Value-Added” Approach Towards Teacher Evaluation.

Thanks to Kenneth Libby for the tip.



“A Brief History Of Intolerance In America”

“A Brief History Of Intolerance In America” is a good slideshow from TIME Magazine. It’s connected to controversy around the mosque near Ground Zero.

A related slideshow comes from Newsweek and is called Mosques in America: Faith and Anger.

I’m going to add these links to others about the mosque at The Best Sites To Help Teach About 9/11.


“Children are more likely to do their homework if they see it as an investment, not a chore”

“Children are more likely to do their homework if they see it as an investment, not a chore” is the first line in a report about a new University of Michigan study.

I already posted about this study and added the information to The Best Resources For Showing Students Why They Should Continue Their Academic Career. The Boston Globe reported on it a couple of months ago. But the study itself was just released. You can get more details about it here, but this is the quote I used from the Globe article describing the experiment:

Students whose career goals did not require education (e.g., sports star, movie star) spent less time on homework and got lower grades. The good news is that the researchers found it was easy to make education more salient, and thereby motivate kids. When students were shown a graph depicting the link between education and earnings, they were much more likely to hand in an extra-credit homework assignment the next day than if they were shown a graph depicting the earnings of superstars.


Some Neat Panoramas Of World Heritage Sites

CyArk is laser-mapping and producing incredible panoramas of five hundred key World Heritage sites. They have a good start, and plan on completing the project by 2013.

I’m adding the link to The Best Sites For Panoramas.

Thanks to Read Write Web for the tip.


The Best Posts About Getting Our Students To Attend College

The issue of who should attend college, how they can be successful while there, and what kind of support they need in order to graduate is regularly discussed in schools and in the media.

I thought it might be useful to pull together a “The Best…” list on this topic including several of my own posts and posts from others whom I respect.

This is a companion list to The Best Resources For Showing Students Why They Should Continue Their Academic Career.

Here are my picks for The Best Posts About Getting Our Students To Attend College (unless indicated otherwise, the posts were written by me):

Instead Of Encouraging Students To Skip College, How About If We Help Them Get There & Graduate?

Should We Give Up on College? by Claus von Zastrow

___________ Shouldn’t Attend College by Corey Bunje Bower

Encouraging Low-Income Students To Go To College

Getting Our Students & Their Families Thinking About College

Getting Low-Income Students to Graduate by Monica Potts at The American Prospect

Additional suggestions are welcome.

If you found this post useful, you might want to look at the 460 other “The Best…” lists and consider subscribing to this blog for free.


Want A Free (& Good) Curriculum For Geometry, Algebra Or U.S. History (& For Other Classes, Too)?

I learned from Richard Byrne today that Dan Meyer, a highly regarded math teacher who uses a lot of multimedia in his lessons, has generously placed his entire curriculum for Geometry and Algebra online for people to use.

Also, just a reminder that I have my entire United States History curriculum from one year ago online, too.

Lastly, even though they certainly are not as complete, you might also find the lessons in my Theory of Knowledge, Ninth Grade English, and Intermediate English class blogs useful.


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