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"Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day..." - 10 new articles

  1. “thinking about revenge stimulates the brain but following through doesn’t improve mood”
  2. “7 Fantastic Free Social Media Tools for Teachers”
  3. Results Of My Survey On Tech Use In Schools
  4. WAHchinga
  5. The Best Sites Showing The Most Popular Tourist Destinations In The World
  6. Can The New “Economic Integration” Study Be Relevant To The Issue Of Tracking By Ability?
  7. More On Halloween
  8. Two Good Links On Chilean Miners
  9. Updated Diwali Resources
  10. “‘Superman’ Offers Mirage, Not A Miracle”
  11. Search Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day...

“thinking about revenge stimulates the brain but following through doesn’t improve mood”

Revenge may be all in the anticipation is the headline of a Los Angeles Times article covering several recent studies on revenge. It’s subtitle is:

Behavioral studies suggest that thinking about revenge stimulates the brain but that following through doesn’t improve mood.

Revenge is a good topic for one of the “life skills” lessons I teach to my students, so I’ll used this material and others to prepare a lesson. I’ll share it with readers.

Do you have any suggestions of other resources — literature, articles, movie scenes — that would also go with that topic?


“7 Fantastic Free Social Media Tools for Teachers”

“7 Fantastic Free Social Media Tools for Teachers” is the title of a Mashable post earlier today.

Most of the sites highlighted won’t be new to readers of this blog, but it does give a good overview of each one.



Results Of My Survey On Tech Use In Schools

In August, I wrote a post titled How Much Is Technology REALLY Used In Your School?

Here’s how I introduced it:

As regular readers know, I’m working on my third book, which now has a new working title, Student Self-Motivation, Responsibility, and Engagement:Practical Answers to Classroom Challenges. It’s a long one, but it is an accurate description of what it’s about.

It will certainly contain ideas for for using educational technology, but that will not be its primary focus. Some of the reviewers of my manuscript suggested I include even a few more tech ideas than I originally had, which I can easily do.

But that got me thinking — how much is technology REALLY used in most classrooms?

So, I have created a very simple survey that should take people considerably less than one minute to complete. It’s admittedly not very scientific, and may very well not provide an extremely accurate answer to the question. But, at the every least, it’ll be interesting to see how people respond.

In the survey, I asked respondents to say what percentage of teachers in their school or, if they work as a district staffperson, in their district, used the following types of technology:

Computer Projector

Document Camera

PowerPoint

Internet For Research

Web 2.0 Tools

I also provide people the opportunity to leave comments, or add more information.

You can see all the results, including the comments, here.

It doesn’t appear that tech is used much in the classrooms.

The big surprise to me was that the two elements of tech that I think have the most educational value (and that students and I use constantly) — the Document Camera and Web 2.0 tools — appear to be the least used by teachers in schools.

I’d be very interested in hearing how others interpret this admittedly unscientific survey. Please leave your comments.


WAHchinga

WAHchinga appears to be some kind of personalized web feed, but I can’t quite figure out how that part works. What I can figure out, though, is that it appears to be a pretty easy search engine for social media.

Because of that, I’m adding it to Not “The Best…,” But “A List” Of Search Engines For Social Media.
.


The Best Sites Showing The Most Popular Tourist Destinations In The World

Next month, I’ll be posting a “The Best…” list related to the “wonders of the world” — both ancient and modern. As sort of a companion list, I thought it would be interesting to bring together some accessible resources highlighting what are considered the most popular tourist destinations.

You might also be interested in these related lists:

The Best Sites Where Students Can Plan Virtual Trips

The Best Resources For Finding And Creating Virtual Field Trips

The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures

The Best Sites For Panoramas

Here are my choices for The Best Sites Showing The Most Popular Tourist Destinations In The World:

The world’s greatest attractions is a slideshow from The Guardian.

1,000 Places To See Before You Die is the website for the famous book of the same name.

Top 10 most visited tourist attractions in the world shows their photos and provides information about each site.

The World’s Top Tourist Attractions is a similar feature.

America’s Top Tourist Attractions is a slideshow from Forbes.

Forbes has a similar slideshow that’s considerably longer.

Most Dangerous Tourist Attractions is a slideshow from AOL.

10 Most Scary and Weird Tourist Attractions in the World is from Listphobia.

Feedback is welcome, including additional suggestions.

If you found this post useful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might also want to explore the 500 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.


Can The New “Economic Integration” Study Be Relevant To The Issue Of Tracking By Ability?

Yesterday, The Washington Post reported on a new study that concludes that lower-income students will do better on academic achievement (measured by tests) in schools where there is “economic integration” with higher income students.

Valerie Strauss does a good job highlighting some of the limitations of the study, too.

I’m wondering, though, if its results might also speak to the issue of tracking by ability within any school…

I know when I teach classes of students who face many challenges, and there are few (if any) others in the class who can be models of perseverance, inquisitiveness, and having high goals, it doesn’t appear to me that as much learning takes place as when there is a “mixed” class.

I’m sure there are readers of this blog who know far more than me about the research on tracking by ability. The little I know about it seems to say that tracking hurts the academically challenged but, at least in some ways, can help the more advanced students. Is that an accurate reading of the research? If it is, I wonder if and how the test results of the higher-income students in yesterday’s study might have been affected? Does anybody know?

Any feedback is appreciated.


More On Halloween

Here are the newest additions to The Best Websites For Learning About Halloween:

An interactive book on Halloween for English Language Learners (thanks to Michelle Henry for the tip)

Here’s a “scary” online video game with Garfield the cat, and here’s its walkthrough.

Here’s a chart showing how Americans will be spending money on Halloween this year.

Describe Dracula’s castle in this fun language-learning interactive. (thanks to In Tec Insights for the tip)


Two Good Links On Chilean Miners

Here are two more additions to The Best Sites For Learning About The Trapped Miners In Chile:

MSN has an interesting slideshow on “Amazing Rescues,” including the miners.

Chile y Toda el Mundo: Connecting the Chilean Miners Story With Universal Themes is an excellent lesson plan from The New York Times Learning Network.


Updated Diwali Resources

I’ve just updated The Best Sites For Learning About Diwali, which is the Hindu celebration that begins on November 5th of this year.

Additional suggestions are always welcome.


“‘Superman’ Offers Mirage, Not A Miracle”

“‘Superman’ Offers Mirage, Not A Miracle” is a great op-ed piece in the Sacramento Bee by Walt Gardner.

I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About The Teacher-Bashing “Waiting For Superman” Movie & Associated Events.



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