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"Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day..." - 5 new articles

  1. Round Robin Reading Research
  2. The Best Posts On Students Reading Aloud Individually In ESL Class — But I Need Your Help Finding Research On The Topic
  3. Another Special Edition Of “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”
  4. The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures
  5. The Best Sites (& Videos) For Learning About Jazz Chants
  6. More Recent Articles
  7. Search Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day...
  8. Prior Mailing Archive

Round Robin Reading Research

Thanks to Julie Niles Petersen, I realized that the reason I couldn’t find research for The Best Posts On Students Reading Aloud Individually In ESL Class — But I Need Your Help Finding Research On The Topic list was because it’s generally called “round robin reading” or “popcorn reading.” Thanks, Julie!

After a search, I found a ton of research pointing out what a bad instructional strategy it is. Here are a few links that I’m adding to that list:

Round Robin Reading: Is there justification for its use or are there better alternatives available for oral reading instruction?

Small Group Reading Instruction (go to page six)

Weighing the Options: Alternatives to Round Robin Reading

 

The Best Posts On Students Reading Aloud Individually In ESL Class — But I Need Your Help Finding Research On The Topic

I’m not a big fan of having English Language Learners read aloud individually in class, though I do have students doing it when it’s part of a small group (reader’s theater or when they’ve practiced reading a short passage and “perform” in front of the class). It seems to me that, outside of those engaging interactions, having students read a passage aloud is not very energizing to them (or even worse — a confidence destroying experience) and pretty deadly for the rest of the class.

However, I know this is a matter of debate among teachers of English Language Learners. I’ve found some good posts about the topic, including tons of comments on them, but I haven’t been able to find a single piece of research on the subject.

So I thought I’d share links to the online discussions, and hope that a reader can recommend research. Can you help me out?

Thanks to Julie Niles Petersen, I realized that the reason I couldn’t find research was because it’s generally called “round robin reading” or “popcorn reading.” Thanks, Julie! After a search, I found a ton of research pointing out what a bad instructional strategy it is. Here are a few links that I’m adding to that list:

Round Robin Reading: Is there justification for its use or are there better alternatives available for oral reading instruction?

Small Group Reading Instruction (go to page six)

Weighing the Options: Alternatives to Round Robin Reading

Here are my choices for The Best Posts On Students Reading Aloud Individually In ESL Class:

Reading aloud allowed? is from Oxford University Press’ English Language Teaching Blog.

Reading aloud in class is a complete waste of time – Discuss… is by Ken Wilson.

Why I hate reading aloud is by Laura Patsko.

To Read or Not To Read is by Tamara Jones.

Jeremy Harmer on reading aloud is online presentation.

Feedback is welcome, as well as additional suggestions.

If you’ve found this list helpful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might want to also view the over seven hundred other “The Best…” lists.

 


Another Special Edition Of “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”

(NOTE: I usually publish this kind of post once-a-week. However, even more links than usual accumulated during the past few days)

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in this blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet sharing them.

Here is Another Special Edition Of “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

I’m making three new additions to The Best Resources For Learning What Google+ Is All About, including:

How are Educators Using Google Plus Hangouts? is from Mind Shift.

Educators On Google+ is an ever-growing spreadsheet. Add you name to it!

7 Ways Google+ Users Are Getting More Out of Their Circles
is from Mashable.

Sample letter to parents re blogging could come in very handy. I’m adding it to The Best Sources For Advice On Student Blogging.

Ego Checks You May Encounter As A Blogger-Turned-Book-Writer is funny and has wisdom. It’s from The Awl. Query Killers is another helpful piece. I’m adding both to So, You Want To Write A Book? Here’s The Best Advice….

Quizlet is on The Best Tools To Make Online Flashcards list. They’ve just added the great ability to have users listen to a word and then have to spell it. This dictation feature is excellent for ELL’s, and EFL Classroom has created a list of links to the best Quizlet dictation activities. I’m adding it to The Best Listening Sites For English Language Learners.

This is a nice post about the Flickr Creative Commons Search tool. Image After is a great place to find free stock images (you can read more about it at Richard Byrne’s blog). I’m adding both to The Best Online Sources For Images.

The Government of Alberta’s (Canada) Education website has an incredible page on research about teaching English Language Learners. I’m adding it to The Best Ways To Keep-Up With Current ELL/ESL/EFL News & Research.

Telling science stories…wait, what’s a “story”?
is a useful article from Scientific American. I’m adding it to The Best Digital Storytelling Resources.

Pick Chow is an interactive game on nutrition. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Nutrition & Food Safety. Thanks to Vicki Davis for the tip.

LyricsNMusic is a nice site that lets you easily search for lyrics and you can a very clean and accessible copy. It also finds music videos of the song. What I particularly like about it, though, is that is shows the lyrics at the top and the video at the bottom, so you can play the music and show the lyrics without students getting distracted by the video. Other sites show the lyrics right next to the video. I’m adding the site to The Best — And Easiest — Ways To Use YouTube If, Like Us, Only Teachers Have Access To It and to The Best Places To Find Lyrics On The Web.

 

The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures

One of the chapters in my book, Helping Students Motivate Themselves, talks about strategies and lessons to use with students about learning from mistakes and failures. I thought I’d put together a “The Best…” list that shares some additional related resources.

Here are my choices for The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures:

What Does Learning From Mistakes Do To Your Brain?

Of course, this Michael Jordan commercial is a classic:

On the importance of failure by Cedar Riener

There’s a great website called “Admitting Failure.” (thanks to Change The Equation for the tip)

Here’s a video book trailer called “BETTER BY MISTAKE: The Unexpected Benefits of Being Wrong by Alina Tugend”

This next video an absolutely fascinating video showing the stages Picasso went through in order to complete a painting. It’s a great example of him making “mistakes” and learning from them. I’m less impressed with the second video (it’s just too long) by Derek Sivers, and it’s called “Why You Need To Fail.” However, at about 9:10 he shows the same Picasso footage and provides a great narration to it (thanks to Greg MacCollum for the tip).



What Is The Accurate Edison Quote On Learning From Failure?

Kevin D. Washburn has written an excellent post at The Edurati Review titled Learning from Mistakes Takes the Right Feedback. Here’s a short excerpt from it, but it’s really worth a visit and a “full read”:

“Dr. Robert Brooks (2007) suggests couching feedback in “we” statements. For example, rather than telling a student that a response is incorrect and to “try harder,” Brooks suggests, in one-on-one conversation, saying, “This strategy you’re using doesn’t seem to be working. Let’s figure out why and how we can change the strategy so that you are successful.” Such a response invites a careful investigation of the mistake and makes the interaction a problem-solving experience. A classroom environment that welcomes error as a gateway to learning contributes to better feedback responses.”

Here’s a TED Talk: Tim Harford: Trial, error and the God complex:

9 Reasons Why Failure Is Not Fatal

And, here are two “bonus” posts:

The Ten Worst Teaching Mistakes by Richard M. Felder

Sue Waters wrote a great post titled “Here’s My Top Five Mistakes Made By New Bloggers — What Are Yours?”

Additional suggestions are welcome.

If you’ve found this list helpful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might want to also view the over seven hundred other “The Best…” lists.

 

The Best Sites (& Videos) For Learning About Jazz Chants

Many teachers of English Language Learners have used “jazz chants” (originally developed by Carolyn Graham) in the classroom, and I thought I’d put together a quick list of useful related resources:

Barbara Hoskins Sakamoto has written an excellent blog post, including a video, sharing the process Graham uses to develop these chants.

Celebrating Twenty-Five Years Of Jazz Chants is an article from New York TESOL.

Here’s a video of Graham explaining jazz chants:

This comes from TEFL Videos:

Using Jazz Chants for Teaching Language Functions comes from The University of Delaware.

Additional suggestions are welcome.

If you’ve found this list helpful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might want to also view the over seven hundred other “The Best…” lists.

 

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