Click here to read this mailing online.

Your email updates, powered by FeedBlitz

 

 
Here are the latest updates for you


 
  1. “33 Animals Who Are Extremely Disappointed In You”
  2. The Bests Posts On Computer-Graded Essays
  3. April’s Best Tweets — Part One
  4. “D-Day To Victory”
  5. Does Intensive Phonics Instruction Treat Students Like Baboons?
  6. More Titanic Resources Keep Coming Online
  7. Wealth Inequality In The World
  8. The Best Resources On How Exercise Helps Learning — Please Contribute Other Resources
  9. Search Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day...
  10. Prior Mailing Archive

“33 Animals Who Are Extremely Disappointed In You”

33 Animals Who Are Extremely Disappointed In You is a great post from BuzzFeed with….33 animal photos, along with captions of what they are thinking.

The pictures would be perfect with the kind of writing activity I suggested in What Would This Animal Be Saying And/Or Thinking?




The Bests Posts On Computer-Graded Essays

One of the latest hot new ed tech topics, encouraged along by another questionable use of private foundation dollars, is developing software so computers can grade essays. That’s going to certainly energize my students to write — instead of working as I do now to try to identify authentic audiences for their writing, they can plan on not having even a single human’s eyes review it.

What do you think?

Here are the best pieces out there that I’ve been able to find on the topic:

Automated essay scoring on state writing tests: as efficiently “meh” as human graders by Sherman Dorn is the most thoughtful post I’ve seen.

Man vs. Computer: Who Wins the Essay-Scoring Challenge? is from Ed Week (be sure to read the comments).

Robo-readers: the new teachers’ helper in the U.S
. is from Reuters.

Here’s a Storify documenting a discussion on this topic between Will Richardson and Justin Reich.

The tests that can be computer scored appeared in Joanne Jacobs blog (again, please read the comments).

Grading essays: Humans vs. machine
appeared in USA Today.

If you found this post useful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might also want to explore the nearly 900 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.



April’s Best Tweets — Part One

Every month I make a short list highlighting my choices of the best resources I shared through (and learned from) Twitter, but didn’t necessarily include them in posts here on my blog. Now and then, in order to make it a bit easier for me, I may try to break it up into mid-month and end-of-month lists (and sometimes I’m a bit late).

I’ve already shared in earlier posts several new resources I found on Twitter — and where I gave credit to those from whom I learned about them. Those are not included again in this post.

If you don’t use Twitter, you can also check-out all of my “tweets” on Twitter profile page or subscribe to their RSS feed.

I use Storify to “curate” my best tweets:

[View the story "April's (2012) Best Tweets -- Part One" on Storify]




“D-Day To Victory”

D-Day To Victory is a very engaging interactive from History Television in Canada.

I’m adding it to The Best Online Resources For Teaching & Learning About World War II.



Does Intensive Phonics Instruction Treat Students Like Baboons?

You may have seen reports on the study released this week showing that baboon could learn to distinguish between true English words and fake ones.

Here’s how Ed Yong explained it:

Grainger thinks that the baboons learned to tell the real words from the fakes by using the frequencies of letter combinations within them. They learned which combinations were most likely to be found in real words, and made their choices accordingly. They had gleaned the stats of English, without any knowledge of the language itself.

The study got me wondering if there were some similarities between what the baboons learned and the approach of teaching intensive phonics. One difference is that in the teaching of intensive phonics students aren’t necessarily taught to distinguish between fake and real words and are even tested on pronouncing the fake ones correctly.

What are your thoughts?

Here are two other links you might be interested in:

Google’s Intelligence Is More Baboon Than Human is from The Atlantic.

The Best Articles & Sites For Teachers & Students To Learn About Phonics




More Titanic Resources Keep Coming Online

Here are today’s additions to The Best Sites For Learning About The Titanic:

Here’s a video from The Guardian:

Titanic: Faces of the crew is a BBC interactive.

The sunken ship of dreams
is a slideshow from The BBC.

Titanic 100: We survived
is also from The BBC.

Titanic memorial cruise makes Atlantic voyage – in pictures is from The Guardian.

Titanic Anniversary is a special page from The Telegraph.



Wealth Inequality In The World

Source: pinaquote.com via Larry on Pinterest

 

 

This quotation comes from an article with some amazing statistics and graphs (though it’s hard to get through the text) called A Short History of Neoliberalism (And How We Can Fix It).

I’m adding it to The Best Resources About Wealth & Income Inequality.



The Best Resources On How Exercise Helps Learning — Please Contribute Other Resources

I’ve recently read some articles on how physical exercise helps students learn, and thought I’d put together a related “The Best…” list. However, I only have a few resources now, and I’m sure there are plenty others out there. I’m hoping readers will contribute more (I, of course, will give you credit for ones I add to this list).

You might also be interested in The Best Resources On Students Using Gestures & Physical Movement To Help With Learning.

Here are my choices for The Best Resources On How Exercise Helps Learning:

How Exercise Fuels the Brain is from The New York Times.

How Exercise Jogs the Brain is from Scientific American.

Bikes, Balls in Class: How Phys Ed Transformed One School is from ABC News.

Exercise Helps Students in the Classroom is from NPR.

A Fit Body Means a Fit Mind is from Edutopia.

Phys Ed: Can Exercise Make Kids Smarter? is from The New York Times.

Morning exercise to spark kids’ learning is from CBC News.

This is obviously not a complete list, and I hope readers can suggest more resources.

If you found this post useful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might also want to explore the nearly 900 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.




Click here to safely unsubscribe from "Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day...." Click here to view mailing archives, here to change your preferences, or here to subscribePrivacy


Your requested content delivery powered by FeedBlitz, LLC, 9 Thoreau Way, Sudbury, MA 01776, USA. +1.978.776.9498