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  1. TED Radio Hour Debut Today
  2. The Best Displays Of Just-Released New York City Historical Photos
  3. The Value Of Student “Ownership”
  4. PostRank, R.I.P.
  5. Arbor Day Resources
  6. The Best Resources For Learning About The Great Depression
  7. More Recent Articles
  8. Search Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day...
  9. Prior Mailing Archive

TED Radio Hour Debut Today

Boy, TED is everywhere…

I previously posted about their upcoming weekly radio show on NPR, and the first one aired today. Their show has its own feature page on NPR, which makes it easy to find.

It’s nicely designed in titled segments, so you can only listen to the sections you want. Weirdly, though, it doesn’t list the guests, only the topics covered. The TED blog shared guests at the first show:

In Episode 1, “Our Buggy Brain,” host Alison Stewart talks with Dan Ariely, Paul Bloom and Dan Gilbert about how our minds inform and sometimes deceive us.

I do hope, though, that the NPR pages names the guests in the future.

I’ll add this info to The Best Teacher Resources For “TED Talks” (& Similar Presentations).




The Best Displays Of Just-Released New York City Historical Photos

The New York City Department of Records has just announced online access to 870,000 historical images of the city. They’re great to show in class, though, in email correspondence I’ve had with them, any educational use of them in student or teacher projects like slideshows requires a license. “They are available without license only for use to illustrate editorial comment in a news story” they said.

Some news organizations apparently have been given permission to reproduce them online. Here are a few sites where you can see some great shots:

Historic Photos From the NYC Municipal Archives is from The Atlantic.

New York, New York: A history in pictures
is from The Associated Press.

A history of New York City in 870,000 photographs is from MSNBC.

Never-before-seen photos from 100 years ago tell vivid story of gritty New York City is from The Mail Online.

I’m adding these resources to The Best Sites For Learning About New York City and to The Best Photos — In The World?

If you found this post useful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might also want to explore the 900 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.



The Value Of Student “Ownership”

Source: pinaquote.com via Larry on Pinterest   

Most teachers understand the value of students feeling “ownership” of their learning, and I’ve written a lot about how inductive learning, student autonomy and choice contribute to that happening. Of course, many others have contributed much more to that understanding, including John Dewey and William Glasser.

Dan Ariely has written about something similar that he calls The Ikea Effect.

Today, Scott Keller wrote a post at the Harvard Business Review blog site that reinforces this perspective. He describes a study reported in a book by Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman (I’ve previously written about his work).

Keller’s post is worth reading in full, but I just wanted to quote from its beginning:

In a famous experiment, researchers ran a lottery with a twist. Half the participants were randomly assigned a lottery number. The remaining half were given a blank piece of paper and a pen and asked to write down any number they would like as their lottery number. Just before drawing the winning number, the researchers offered to buy back the tickets. The question researchers wanted to answer is, “How much more do you have to pay someone who ‘wrote their own number’ versus someone who was handed a number randomly?” The rational answer would be that there is no difference (given that a lottery is pure chance and therefore every ticket number, chosen or assigned, should have the same value). A more savvy answer would be that you would have to pay less for the tickets where the participant chose the number, given the possibility of duplicate numbers in the population who wrote their own number. The real answer? No matter what location or demographic the experiment has taken place in, researchers have always found that they have to pay at least five times more to those who wrote their own number.

This result reveals an inconvenient truth about human nature: When we choose for ourselves, we are far more committed to the outcome — by a factor of five to one.

Something we should probably all keep in mind when we’re teaching…




PostRank, R.I.P.

When Google bought PostRank last year (see Bye Bye, PostRank? I Hope Not…) many of us feared they would be closing it down, and that concern is now real.

PostRank just announced they were closing down on May 1st.

No more sidebar widgets letting readers know what blogs posts were the most popular, and no more ranked listings of popular education blogs.

PostRank, R.I.P.



Arbor Day Resources

Today’s Arbor Day in the United States.

You might be interested in The Best Sites To Learn About Trees.




The Best Resources For Learning About The Great Depression

As I did a couple of days ago with my “The Best…” list on World War I resources, I’m taking the lazy way out here and just copying and pasting my post on the Depression over at our United States History Class blog. I’m sure readers can figure out the context of the links. And I hope you’ll suggest additional ones.

Here are my choices for The Best Resources For Learning About The Great Depression:

Go to FDR and The New Deal. Get the code from Mr. Ferlazzo.

Go to African-Americans and the New Deal. Get the code from Mr. Ferlazzo.

ON YOUR OWN

Watch this move about what caused the Great Depression and take the quizzes.

Watch this second movie about the Great Depression and take the quizzes.

Learn more about The Great Depression. Be sure to click on the lower left hand corner so you can read the words as they are spoken.

Look at these color photographs of the Great Depression.

Watch this slideshow about the Great Depression.

Watch these videos about The Great Depression.

Take this test about the Depression.

Take a virtual field trip in The Great Depression.

Watch this video about The Great Depression.

Voices From The Great Depression
Watch this movie about Franklin Roosevelt and The New Deal. Take the quizzes, please.

Read about President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Watch this video about President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Learn about the Tennessee Valley Authority.

WITH A PARTNER

Read more about President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Read more about The Great Depression.

Take this quiz on The Great Depression.

SPANISH LANGUAGE PREVIEW:

Brainpop Movie

As I mentioned earlier, I hope you’ll recommend more!

If you found this post useful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might also want to explore the 900 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.



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