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rusticle
n. An icicle-like rust structure formed underwater on rusting iron. [Blend of rust and icicle.]

 

Example Citations:
The Halomonas titanicae bacterium was found in "rusticles", the porous and delicate icicle-like structures that form on rusting iron.
—"New species of bacteria found in Titanic 'rusticles'," BBC News, December 6, 2010

 

Dr Avery said: "It could be that there are some new ecosystems living on the Titanic. We will understand better how these wrecks decay and how long we have to preserve records of them." The images have found evidence of the growth of rusticle, rust formation similar to an icicle or stalactite, on the bow's starboard side.
—Laura Roberts, "Titanic wreckage to be raised digitally by new 3D map," The Daily Telegraph, August 31, 2010

 

Earliest Citation:
Dr. Robert Ballard, head of a research team currently photographing the sunken luxury liner, said yesterday the vessel's exquisite woodwork has all but disappeared....The ship, inside and out, is covered with stalactite-like icicles of rust or 'rusticles,' he said.
—Barbara Yaffe, "Rust 'icicles' drape hull of Titanic," The Globe and Mail, July 17, 1986

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patent cliff
n. A sharp drop in revenue that a company experiences when a lucrative patent expires.

 

Example Citations:
Lilly is already facing the biggest "patent cliff" in the industry. Five of its six leading products face generic competition in the next four years. Barbara Ryan, a stock analyst with Deutsche Bank, said Lilly's earnings will decline 35 percent by 2014 unless it makes one of the larger acquisitions it has historically resisted.
—Duff Wilson, "Lilly Stops Alzheimer's Drug Trials," The New York Times, August 17, 2010

 

There is a simple explanation for most of the mergers and acquisitions in the pharmaceutical world these days: the so-called Patent Cliff. Simply put, many of the drug industry's biggest earners — blockbuster medications that have paid the bills for the last decade — are about to lose their patent protections.
—Christopher K. Hepp, "Big Pharma gearing up to face the Patent Cliff," The Philadelphia Inquirer, November 12, 2010

 

Earliest Citation:
Stanford University is poised at the edge of "the cliff," its term for the financial turning point when its leading patent — the Cohen-Boyer recombinant DNA patent — expires.
—"At the edge of Cohen-Boyer patent 'cliff', Stanford seeks $ 15 M cushion," Biotechnology Newswatch, June 21, 1993

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data exhaust
n. The digitally trackable or storable actions, choices, and preferences that people generate as they go about their daily lives.

 

Example Citations:
In Brin's way of thinking, each of our lives is a potential contribution to scientific insight. We all go about our days, making choices, eating things, taking medications, doing things—generating what is inelegantly called data exhaust.
—Thomas Goetz, "Sergey Brin's Search for a Parkinson's Cure," Wired, June 22, 2010

 

Some firms will make a living based entirely on mining "data exhaust", the bits and bytes produced by other activities. One example is Google's PowerMeter, which not only lets users check their use of electricity online but gives Google access to lots of data to analyse and, not least, sell advertisements against.
—"Augmented business," The Economist, November 4, 2010

 

Earliest Citation:
Merchants have a larger problem when it comes to collecting data about customers. Often, there's just too much information to make any sense out of it, a problem that has spurred interest in analysis software and services to sort through all that data. "The Web and e-mail create a tremendous amount of data exhaust," says Steve Markowitz, CEO of Intellipost Inc. "Anytime you click on a page, data are thrown off. The question is how do you harness data in a fashion that is meaningful."
—Nick Wingfield, "A Marketer's Dream," The Wall Street Journal, December 7, 1998

Notes:
Data exhaust is also sometimes called digital exhaust, a term that dates to about 2008.

 

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competitive commuting
pp. Racing another cyclist while commuting to or from work.
competitive commuter n.

 

Example Citations:
A recent article in Good magazine about competitive commuting has sparked lively conversation on cycling blogs and across the Web. Some cyclists cheered the notion, admitting to frequently speeding up to challenge others, while many, including racers and the die-hard all-weather commuters, thought the whole notion was laughable.
—J. David Goodman, "Let's Race! If Only in Our Minds," The New York Times, December 12, 2010

 

I love your blog and the feminine perspective and I always forward it to all my female cyclist friends...and as a male I agree the competitive commuting attitude is a little irritating from my perspective too.
—Willis, "Out of My Way, Boys!" (comment), Let's Go Ride a Bike, April 28, 2010

 

Earliest Citation:
My cycling to work is about saving money and losing inches from my waist. It is a way of getting to work, it is not a race! It is not a race! But.......
—James Cleverly, "Competitive commuting," jamescleverly.blogspot.com, January 30, 2007

Notes:
In competitive bike racing, each event is divided into five "ability categories," where Category 1 is for elite cyclists, and Category 5 is for beginning or inexperienced racers. This explains why some people refer to competitive commuting (also called commuter racing) as Category 6 (or Cat 6) racing:

Cyclists have a joke about "racing in cat 6," which, despite the name, is not exactly a race nor does it refer to an official category of cyclists. Cat 6 refers to commuter cyclists, and racing each other to work is their sport. Also called "the great commuter race" and "hipster racing," cat-6 racing is the unspoken urban tradition of trying to go faster than, and not get passed by, a stranger on your bike.
—"Cat 6: Competitive commuting Turns Bike Rides into Races," GOOD, November 9, 2010

 

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trypophobia
n. An unusually strong fear of, or aversion to, holes, particularly tiny holes that appear clustered together.
trypophobic adj.
trypophobe n.

 

Example Citations:
I have a phobia. Well, it's not a fear so much as this deep-seated existential disgust. ... It is ... clusters. Specifically, irregular clusters of organically shaped holes or bumps. ... But it turns out this seems common, though I can't find a single bit of research or any articles about it. There are even Internet-coined terms for it: trypophobia, or repetitive pattern phobia.
—K. Williams Brown, "The improbable horror of clusters," Statesman Journal, December 12, 2010

 

So, while on-line tonight, I decided to google "fear of holes." A bunch of forums that are related to phobias jumped out at me, and after several readings, I realized that I suffer from trypophobia.
—"Trypophobia," Mortgage News, October 13, 2010

 

Earliest Citation:
Anyway...the name for the phobia is trypophobia. There are actually quite a few people with the phobia, but most of them are girls.
—catiedowen46051, "Phobia of Holes," SocialPhobiaWorld.com, April 27, 2006

Notes:
This word combines the Greek terms trypa, "hole" and phobia, "fear".

 

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sloppy payer
n. A person who is careless about paying bills and repaying debts.

 

Example Citations:
By contrast, there are "sloppy payers," who pay only some bills on time; "abusers," who are defiant about paying; and "distressed borrowers," who simply do not have the means to pay.
—Eric Dash, "Risky Borrowers Find Credit Again, at a Price," The New York Times, December 12, 2010

 

"I think we are seeing some consumer behavior change where people are paying attention to their financial situation, keeping an eye on keeping their [credit] score intact," said Christopher Brendler, an analyst at Stifel Nicolaus. "Credit card [companies] make a lot of money on sloppy payers, people who pay you but pay you late. The worst case for credit card companies is when everyone who pays you late charges off."
—Jonathan Starkey, "Capital One Copes as Clients Kick Habits," The Washington Post, August 10, 2009

 

Earliest Citation:
Early payment delinquencies and other types of accounts viewed as most likely to go seriously delinquent must be pursued aggressively, while customers who are routinely "sloppy payers" likely require little or no expensive collection activity.
—Andrew J. Jaske, "Managing mortgage credit risk," Mortgage Banking, May 1, 1997

Notes:
Here's a slightly older citation that references a country instead of a person:

Other observers are less positive, noting laws are rarely implemented properly, state corruption is endemic and Kazakhstan is proving to be a sloppy payer of foreign debts.
—Douglas Busvine, "Kazakhstan to vote for strong presidential rule," Reuters News, August 27. 1995

 

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flash crash
n. An extremely rapid decline in the stock market.

 

Example Citations:
While individual investors have yanked more money out of U.S. stock mutual funds than they put in every week since the scary one-day "flash crash" 29 weeks ago, the pace of withdrawals is slowing.
—Adam Shell, "Some small investors buying stocks again," USA Today, November 29, 2010

 

Malfunctioning algorithms, "flash crashes", and complex debt-laden companies have been highlighted by the corporate regulator in its review of the Australian Securities Exchange's supervisory capabilities.
—Stuart Washington, "Regulator runs rule over ASX capabilities," The Age, December 1, 2010

 

Earliest Citation:
Those of us old enough to remember the flash crash of October 1987 will recall that after some sharp down days the market rally was led and turned by an obscure Chicago futures Index.
—Bill Harcourt, "Fighting withdrawal," Manly Daily, August 8, 2007

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