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nanobreak
n. A brief vacation, particularly one that includes just one night away from home. Also: nano-break.

 

Example Citations:
Anticipating this newly emerging travel trend, Hotels.com has planned special discounts on hotels in the Asia-Pacific, Americas and Europe from the year's end until the middle of February, a period that includes the New Year's Day and Lunar New Year holidays, to allow Korean travelers to enjoy nanobreaks more easily.
—Lee Hyo-sik, "'Nanobreaks' new tourism trend in S. Korea," Korea Times, December 23, 2010

 

There has been a 29% increase in the number of UK holidaymakers searching for single-night holidays — or "nano-breaks" — over the past year, according to Hotels.com.
—"Short Breaks Up 29% As Brits Keep On Travelling," Hotels.com, February 17, 2009

 

Earliest Citation:
But despite the mounds of luggage in the boot of the prime ministerial Land Cruiser plus one very smart guitar case this is not really a holiday at all. It is more of a nanobreak to show support for the British tourist industry.
—Robert Hardman, "Tony's country jaunt," Daily Mail, August 2, 2002

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filmanthropy
n. Moviemaking that aims to shed light on and raise money for a cause or charity.
filmanthropist n.
filmanthropic adj.

 

Example Citations:
Leonsis, for now, has curtailed his work in feature films. Producing documentaries on such serious subjects as the Japanese destruction of Nanking and a national soccer program for the homeless, he coined the word, "filmanthropy," which he described as "shedding light on a big issue" while raising money for charity.
—Bob Cohn, "Capitals owner eyes own 'compelling event'," Pittsburgh Tribune Review, December 26, 2010

 

"If people become engaged through movies, they become captive and immersed, so when they come out of the theater, hopefully they'll be engaged," she said. "I want all viewers to feel a part of this mission." Some might liken this type of documentary and fundraising event to the trend toward "filmanthrophy [sic]."
—Adrienne Washington, "Helping women, a tweet at a time," The Washington Times, March 1, 2009

 

Earliest Citation:
Three films in this month's Toronto International Film Festival, all with a strong social-activist message — American Gun, North Country and Good Night, and Good Luck — were partially financed by a company called Participant Productions. And in each case, the films aren't there just to entertain, but, according to the agenda of Participant Productions founder, Jeffrey Skoll, to change society. ... But the ultimate goal is what might be called filmanthropy.
—Liam Lacey, "The filmanthropist," The Globe and Mail, September 20, 2005

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motor-homeless
adj. Relating to a person who is homeless except for a motorhome or similar RV. Also: motor homeless.

 

Example Citations:
Welcome to Venice Beach, California, where tensions are rising between homeowners and the motor homeless who take over entire streets living out of campers, vans, buses, trucks and RVs.
—William La Jeunesse, "Homeowners vs. 'Motor-Homeless'" (video), Fox News, August 12, 2010

 

I'm a "wanna-be" Motor-Homeless person. I would like to spend retirement living/visiting places of beauty and interest. I hope to learn how to do this without annoying the full time residents of places I visit.
—Hank, "Motor-homeless causing a stir on Seattle's streets" (comment), RV Wheel Life, July 18, 2009

 

Earliest Citation:
Cedric Glazer and Nisarga Maharaj, sitting at another table, said they had never been to a soup kitchen, but saw a notice for the dinner. "I call myself motor-homeless, because I travel around in my old motor home and don't live anywhere," Glazer said.
—"Homeless shelter invites everyone — and many show up," The Associated Press, November 23, 2001

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he-vage
n. A man's chest, especially when revealed by an unbuttoned shirt. Also: hevage. [Blend of he and cleavage.]

 

Example Citations:
In what must appear to be the strangest manoeuvre in the age-old battle of the sexes, men, after centuries of contemplating the feminine cleavage with a mixture of lust, envy, and aesthetic detachment, have finally decided enough is enough, and gotten themselves their own cleavage — a 'male cleavage' — best showcased through the he-vage T-shirt.
—Lhendup Bhutia, "The Murse code," DNA, September 26, 2010

 

Having come of age post-Take That, in an era where JLS leads the way in cheeky winks to camera and male cleavage (the hevage, bulging beneath American Apparel extended V-necks like a beast about to burst from a chest, signifying, in the same way Ridley Scott's phallic birthing alien did, both the masculine and feminine in one single swell), One Direction has got the combination of sex and son down pat.
—Eva Wiseman, "Up front: Eva Wiseman," The Observer, December 12, 2010

 

Earliest Citation:
The question is: how much of his chest or 'he-vage' should a man reveal when he's wearing a shirt?
—Ursula Hirschkorn, "How much he-vage should a man show?," Daily Mail, October 4, 2007

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