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physible
n. A digital file containing instructions that enable a 3D printer to create a physical object. [Physical + feasible.]
Example Citations:
A "physible" is a digital plan for an object that can either be designed on a computer or uploaded with a 3D scanner. Those plans can be downloaded and used to assemble real, tangible objects using a 3D printer. Printers are getting more affordable, but they're still limited by the kinds of materials they can use.
—Jon Mitchell, "Forget MP3s: Soon You'll Download Your Sneakers From The Pirate Bay," ReadWriteWeb, January 24, 2012

 

Physibles are 3D printer plans for duplicating physical objects. This is a fascinating insight and early glimpse into the post-scarcity economy. This is a landmark event marking the transition of post-scarcity from the online world leaking into the physical world.
—MstrLance, "Physibles and post-scarcity economy," LinkSwarm, January 28, 2012

 

Earliest Citation:
We believe that the next step in copying will be made from digital form into physical form. It will be physical objects. Or as we decided to call them: physibles. Data objects that are able (and feasible) to become physical. We believe that things like three dimensional printers, scanners and such are just the first step. We believe that in the nearby future you will print your spare sparts [sic] for your vehicles.
—WinstonQ2038, "Evolution: New category.," The Pirate Bay, January 23, 2012

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SIFI
n. A financial institution so crucial to the economy that its failure could cause a financial crisis. [From the phrase systemically important financial institution.]
Example Citations:
The FSB list of 29 banks, known as "SIFIs," includes those judged to be the most globally important to the financial system by their size and complexity. The measures were agreed on by regulators to prevent any "systemically important financial institution" from failing and roiling the global economy.
—"Global regulators to subject 29 banks to stricter regulations," The Washington Post, November 4, 2011

 

Q: Is AIG part of the new regulation that came with the new Dodd-Frank legislation and the SIFI (systemically important financial institutions), or too-big-to-fail rules?

A: We don't know yet because that's one of the concerns the market has right now. We're not sure where we're going to come out on the federal landscape for SIFI regulations. So we don't know if we're going to be regulated as a SIFI.
—Maria Bartiromo, "AIG chief sees a 'core of strength' in U.S. economy," USA Today, August 14, 2011

 

Earliest Citation:
The place to begin is to establish an effective system of regulating the solvency and improving the transparency of systemically important financial institutions. I'm going to call them "SIFIs" from now on for short.
—Robert Litan, "Where were the watchdogs? The financial crisis and the breakdown of financial governance," Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, March 4, 2009

Notes:
A variation on this theme is the G-SIFI, a global (or globally) systemically important financial institution, so-deemed because its failure could precipitate a global financial crisis:

The FSB also said "global systemically important financial institutions" should be required to hold larger reserves than smaller banks and be subject to greater scrutiny by regulators....

Once the list of "G-SIFIs" is complete, Mr. Draghi said in his report that he would propose by the end of 2011 additional measures that national authorities should use to keep any globally systemic firms they happen to regulate in check.
—Kevin Carmichael, "G20 forges ahead with 'too big to fail' controls," The Globe and Mail, November 12, 2010

In case you're wondering, the related phrase too big to fail isn't at all new, and in fact dates to at least 1908.

 

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hardlink
n. A tag, such as a barcode, assigned to an object that, when scanned with a smartphone or reader, displays online data about the object. Also: hard-link, hard link. —v.
hardlinking pp.
Example Citations:
The key difference between the two dimensional QR code and the single dimensional barcode is the amount of data they contain. Quick Response codes are also known as hardlinks or physical world hyperlinks. QR Codes store up to 4,296 alphanumeric characters of arbitrary text. This text can be anything, for example, a URL, contact information, a telephone number, even a blog post!
—Bob Leah, "Create a Quick Response Code (QR Code) image using Google Chart," IBM developerWorks, March 14, 2011

 

Although invented in Japan in the 1990s, QR codes are only just being used by UK businesses.

The code consists of black modules arranged in a square pattern on a white background.

When the encoded information is accessed via an app on a smartphone it is termed hardlinking or object hyperlinking.
—"Code provides link to law firm information," The Plymouth Herald, July 28, 2011

 

Earliest Citation:
The simplicity of linking from the physical world into the electronic world, known as 'physical world hyperlinks' or a 'hardlink' is the essence of the QR code and explains its enormous popularity.
—Paul Bowers, "Why is QR Code Important to Business?," Ezine Articles, September 17, 2007

Notes:
A hardlink is also known as a physical world hyperlink or an object hyperlink. The term originally referred to an alphanumeric code associated with an object that, when entered into a browser, would look up the code in a special database and take the browser to online information about the object. That sense dates to at least 2005, but it has been superseded by the above sense.

One of the most common hardlinks these days is the QR code (Quick Response code), which contains alphanumeric text (such as a web address) encoded in a graphical pattern. For example, the QR code on the right encodes the address of this page. Retailers and advertisers are using these codes in the real world (for example, on storefronts and in the pages of newspapers and magazines), and the idea is that we are supposed to use QR code-reading apps on our smartphones to scan these codes and link to information about the retailer or product. (Meta project idea: Print out the QR code on the right and then scan it to hardlink to a page devoted to hardlinking.)

 

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phantom vibration
n. The perception of a cell phone's vibration in the absence of an incoming call or text message.
Example Citations:
It's not a trivial problem, according to his study of stress levels in 100 smartphone users, including university students, retail workers and public-sector employees. Some users in the study were so hooked that they reported feeling "phantom vibrations" from non-existent text messages.
—Adriana Barton, "Smartphone stress: Can you say irony?," The Globe and Mail, January 22, 2012

 

Psychologically, the key to deciphering phantom vibrations is "hypothesis-guided search," a theory that describes the selective monitoring of physical sensations, says Jeffrey Janata, director of the behavioral medicine program at University Hospitals in Cleveland. It suggests that when cellphone users are alert to vibrations, they are likely to experience sporadic false alarms, he says.
—Angela Haupt, "Good vibrations? Bad? None at all?," USA Today, June 12, 2007

 

Earliest Citation:
Just yesterday I thought my phone was ringing (vibrating) several times but when I went to answer it no one was there and no missed calls....

I tried searching for similar experiences but only found a few references to phantom vibration syndrome.
—carverrn, "Phantom vibration Syndrome?," eHealth Forum, June 2, 2004

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