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cyberflaneur
n. A person who surfs the web with no purpose beyond curiosity and inquisitiveness.
cyberflaneurism n.
cyberflanerie n.
Example Citations:
Intrigued, I set out to discover what happened to the cyberflâneur. While I quickly found other contemporaneous commentators who believed that flânerie would flourish online, the sad state of today's Internet suggests that they couldn't have been more wrong. Cyberflâneurs are few and far between, while the very practice of cyberflânerie seems at odds with the world of social media.
—Evgeny Morozov, "The Death of the Cyberflâneur," The New York Times, February 4, 2012

 

The practices of cyberflaneurism and cyberphotography differ significantly from traditional flaneurism in this regard. Where the 18th-and 19th-century flaneur sought to evaluate and describe modern transformations in work, politics and public life more generally and the collective consciousness given rise to by these changes, cyberflaneurs-cum-street-photographers inhabit an environment shaped by an ever-increasing publicization of private life.
—"Loitering in cyberspace: Cheryl Sourkes' takes snapshots of the web's digital citizenry," C: International Contemporary Art, June 22, 2007

 

Earliest Citation:
I see the value of cyberspace not in the replacement of our cities, but in its potential to rekindle our fondness for and fascination with urban environs. The attraction that it exerts on the millions that stroll through its maze of information might be used to reinvigorate our cities. Cyberflaneurs have become captivated with the Internet's ready supply of huge amounts of information that they can access at all times of day or night.
—Udo Greinacher in Nan Ellin (ed.), Architecture of Fear, Princeton Architectural Press, February 1, 1997

Notes:
The word flaneur, a saunterer or "man about town" (there's an old-fashioned phrase for you) comes from the French flâner, "to saunter idly", and first appeared in English around 1854. A cyberflaneur is also known as a virtual flaneur, a term that also dates to 1997 (and in fact its first use is in the same essay as the earliest cite for cyberflaneur; see page 290).

 

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slacklining
n. A sport that involves walking or balancing on a slack nylon webbing suspended between two points. Also: slack-lining, slack lining.
slackline v., n.
slackliner n.
Example Citations:
If you saw the Super Bowl halftime show, you probably wondered, "Who's that guy in a toga bouncing crazily on a rope next to Madonna? And how's he doing it?" The guy was Andy Lewis, a slacklining champion from California, and he did it after many, many years of practice. Slacklining is different from tightrope walking. Instead of a taught [sic] line, it's performed on inch-thick nylon webbing that stretches and bounces.
—Marc Silver, "After the Super Bowl, Everyone's Curious About Slacklining," National Geographic News Watch, February 8, 2012

 

The distinction separates slacklining from seemingly similar ventures, such as tightrope walking, in which the rope is stretched tightly and remains static. A slackline moves, however, and when a beginner follows the impulse to concentrate on keeping her feet still, it moves even more, swinging from side to side as the feet clench it with increasing intensity.
—Diana Saverin, "Slackliners find balance one step at a time," Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, December 11, 2011

 

Earliest Citation:
Potter, a 26-year-old "slack liner," was tethered to the rope by a leash attached to a harness that was wrapped around his waist and legs....

Slack lining, or loose rope walking, is part sport, part mind game, part spiritual quest. It requires physical agility, precision and balance to walk atop a line stretched over a precipice.
—Nora Zamichow, "A spiritual quest on a rope—at 1,200 feet," Los Angeles Times, November 28, 1998

Notes:
The suspended nylon webbing is called a slackline. If the slackline is suspended high over the ground, it's called highlining. Other variants include tricklining (performing tricks on the slackline), waterlining (slacklining over water), and urbanlining (slacklining in a park or other urban location). And, yes, the dude in the toga during the recent Super Bowl halftime show was slacklining.

 

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Grexit
n. The exit of Greece from the eurozone. [Greece or Greek + exit.]
Example Citations:
But the fact the damage would be lighter makes such a Grexit more likely. And with Greece currently struggling to secure reform pledges from its public sector and its wider population, the willingness of overseas creditors to help has diminished somewhat.
—"Greek impasse raise fears of 'Grexit'," The Guardian, February 7, 2012

 

At a time when Athens is still involved in debt restructuring negotiations with its private creditors, Neelie Kroes' recent allusions to a Greek exit from the euro are a sign that European leaders are intent on preparing the terrain for such an eventuality.
—Marc Peeperkorn, "The 'Grexit' taboo has been broken," Presseurop, February 8, 2012

 

Earliest Citation:
In this piece, we make two key points: First, we raise our estimate of the likelihood of Greek exit from the eurozone (or 'Grexit') to 50% over the next 18 months from earlier estimates of ours which put it at 25-30%.
—William Buiter and Ebrahim Rahbari, "Rising Risks of Greek Euro Area Exit," Citigroup Global Markets, February 6, 2012

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altmetrics
n. Tools used to assess the impact of scholarly articles based on alternative online measures such as bookmarks, links, blog posts, and tweets. Also: alt-metrics. [Alternative + metrics.]
Example Citations:
Luckily, there is a growing movement within the scientific establishment to better measure and reward all the different ways that people contribute to the messy and complex process of scientific progress. This movement has begun to gather loosely around the banner of "altmetrics," which was born out of a simple recognition: Many of the traditional measurements are too slow or simplistic to keep pace with today's internet-age science.
—Samuel Arbesman, "New Ways to Measure Science," Wired Science, January 9, 2012

 

An approach called altmetrics—short for alternative metrics—aims to measure Web-driven scholarly interactions, such as how often research is tweeted, blogged about, or bookmarked. "There's a gold mine of data that hasn't been harnessed yet about impact outside the traditional citation-based impact," says Dario Taraborelli, a senior research analyst with the Strategy Team at the Wikimedia Foundation and a proponent of the idea.
—Jennifer Howard, "Scholars Seek Better Ways to Track Impact Online," The Chronicle of Higher Education, January 29, 2012

 

Earliest Citation:
I like the term #articlelevelmetrics, but it fails to imply *diversity* of measures. Lately, I'm liking #altmetrics.
—Jason Priem, @jasonpriem, Twitter, September 28, 2010

Notes:
Although the prudent neologism collector must at all times be on guard against Twitter-based coinages that are just silly (an adjective that can be rightfully applied to the vast majority of such terms), exceptions sometimes cry out to be made. To wit, I offer you tweetation, a tweet that cites a scholarly article:

For the purpose of this paper, I call a citation in a tweet (mentioning a journal article URL) a "tweetation", to distinguish it from a citation in a journal article (which is the metric I compared tweetations against).
—Gunther Eysenbach, "Can Tweets Predict Citations? Metrics of Social Impact Based on Twitter and Correlation with Traditional Metrics of Scientific Impact," Journal of Medical Internet Research, December 16, 2011

 

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