OUPblog - "“We could build a future where people are free”: reflections on the Eurovision Song Contest" plus more...



“We could build a future where people are free”: reflections on the Eurovision Song Contest

Spectacle at its grandest has long been crucial to the Eurovision Song Contest’s projection of its own importance for Europe and, increasingly in the past two decades, a unified Europe’s position in the world. Each year’s competition outstrips that of the year before, as song styles multiply and nations are added to the spectacle of nation competing against nation with the hope of representing Europe musically to the world. The restrictions imposed by rigid performance guidelines—three...

Read the whole entry... »

When governments take counterterrorism policy into other policy areas, we should be worried

The last few years have seen enormous public debate over the collection of metadata through mass surveillance. We now know that intelligence authorities globally have been casting a wide dragnet to capture communications metadata, which they then retain and mine for information. Governments including those in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia claimed the primary reason for doing this was to prevent terrorism. But then they started using the same tools for non-terrorist...

Read the whole entry... »

Realism of social and cultural origins

How can realism in science be defined? Philosophers, historians, and the general public, have always related it to a philosophical doctrine or a technological effect. However, there is a type of realism — very widespread in science — that has gone unnoticed among scholars: the realist attitude of social and cultural origins. Behind this attitude lie commercial and engineering interests. Identifying this attitude is vital, because many scientists’ ideas were influenced by these kinds of...

Read the whole entry... »

How to be good

‘How to be good?’ is the pre-eminent question for ethics, although one that philosophers and ethicists seldom address head on. It was the question Plato posed in a slightly different form in The Republic when he said, “We are discussing no trivial subject, but how a man should live.” Marcus Aurelius thought he knew the answer. When he unequivocally stated in his Meditations “A King’s lot: to do good and be damned.” He was himself a king and ruled almost all of the world...

Read the whole entry... »


Contact UsPast IssuesJoin This ListUnsubscribe

   


Email subscriptions powered by FeedBlitz, LLC, 365 Boston Post Rd, Suite 123, Sudbury, MA 01776, USA.